cacao-now-hemp-hearts-title-1 Cannabis sativa Hemp Hearts -

Tiny but mighty, hemp seeds are chock-full of healthy fats, plant-based proteins, and other crucial nutrients.

Their fatty and amino acid profiles are identically aligned with human DNA, so as a food source, they offer protein, omegas and dietary fiber in perfect proportions to the nutritional needs of the human body.

Hemp hearts are especially valuable for vegetarians, vegans and health seekers looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet, as they contain all 10 essential amino acids. Relatively few plant-based foods are complete sources of protein. Hemp protein is highly nutritious and easily assimilated.

Hemp seed oil is a perfect balance of Omega 3-6-9, ideally suited for optimal human nutrition.


In any food source, the ratio of Omega 3’s to Omega 6’s is vital. People commonly consume too many Omega 6’s and not enough Omega 3’s. The addition of hemp seeds in our diet helps achieve this balance and contributes to reducing inflammation in the body.

Hemp seeds are a great source of critically-acclaimed, essential fatty acids like alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, an Omega 3), and Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA, an Omega 6). Omega 3 deficiency is associated with depression, heart disease, arthritis, cancer, and many other health issues. GLA has been shown to help with cholesterol, inflammation, skin and hair health, balancing hormones, and general heart health.

Hemp hearts are also an excellent source of digestible fiber and a wide array of minerals and vitamins, including phosphorus, zinc, iron, magnesium, manganese, Vitamin E, and B vitamins.

Hemp is non-GMO, virtually free of any form of residual chemicals, as well as free of trypsin inhibitors. Hemp seed/grain is also an excellent source of digestible fibre and a wide array of minerals and vitamins.


History

For over 10,000 years — with some records dating back to ancient Mesopotamia

— hemp has been grown and harvested across the planet, acting as a reliable source of food and fiber.

In 1606, the very first hemp crop is said to have been planted in North America.

By the 1700’s, it developed a reputation as an essential crop, and farmers were required by law to cultivate it. In the 1800’s, it became a pivotal incentive for new settlers in Canada, with the King of England offering free land and hemp seeds to anyone immigrating to the country. In America, hemp quickly became a vital crop for farmers, food for citizens, and a noteworthy component in textile production.


History

For over 10,000 years — with some records dating back to ancient Mesopotamia

— hemp has been grown and harvested across the planet, acting as a reliable source of food and fiber.

In 1606, the very first hemp crop is said to have been planted in North America.

By the 1700’s, it developed a reputation as an essential crop, and farmers were required by law to cultivate it. In the 1800’s, it became a pivotal incentive for new settlers in Canada, with the King of England offering free land and hemp seeds to anyone immigrating to the country. In America, hemp quickly became a vital crop for farmers, food for citizens, and a noteworthy component in textile production.


Traditionally, the seeds and flower tops of the hemp plant were used to address a variety of ailments, specifically from 2,700 BC through Roman times.

Today, this multifaceted annual crop is planted by farmers in the springtime, using non-GMO certified seed, and harvested in the autumn.


The types of hemp plants grown for food purposes can reach about five feet tall.

Once it begins to grow, its broad leaves naturally suppress weeds, meaning the assistance of herbicide and pesticide is not needed.

But hemp is cultivated for more than simply being a nutritious food source — its varied uses all promote a more sustainable world. Hemp products are reusable, recyclable, and completely biodegradable. Some sources claim hemp can even reduce global warming, as it takes out significant amounts of carbon dioxide per acre.


Hemp is a variety of the Cannabis Sativa plant species. The cultivation of hemp for food is a totally separate process — and strain of the plant — than the cultivation and production of marijuana. Due to controversy surrounding marijuana, and in the name of ‘the war on drugs,’ hemp production for food has even been restricted and banned in certain countries.

Visit hemptrade.ca for more information.


Cacao Now products containing hemp hearts: Original Gangster Buddha Bites, Nuts & Seeds Buddha Bites, and gRAWnola.