cacao-now-ingredients-raisins-title-1 Vitis vinifera Raisins -

Raisins, or dried grapes, are sweet morsels just bursting with healthful benefits. Rich in antioxidants, fiber, calcium, boron, and iron, raisins are a delicious way to give the body exactly what it needs to thrive. 

A superb instant energy boost, raisins are a favourite snack of endurance athletes, providing carbohydrates that fuel muscles while increasing energy and performance abilities. As they are a natural energy source with a medium glycaemic index, they release energy slower than processed foods. This prolonged sustenance is helpful in keeping an active person fueled. 


Raisins contain both soluble and insoluble dietary fibres, and prebiotics like inulin. Prebiotic solubles help by initiating the growth of good gut bacteria, which ultimately helps improve our gut health, and also lowers cholesterol, improves metabolism, and increases immune system function.


The insoluble fibers found in raisins support regular bowel movements. Soluble fibers found in raisins support the heart as well, attaching to cholesterol particles found in our digestive tract and removing them from the body. This contributes to an overall reduction in cholesterol levels and lowers the potential for heart disease.

Regular consumption of raisins has been proven to reduce cardiovascular risks related to blood pressure rate, as raisins are low in sodium and contain potassium, which helps blood vessels to relax. 

Antioxidants are found in raisins, and these essential compounds help protect against free radicals and oxidative damage in the body. Eliminating free radicals and oxidative stresses reduces the risk of tumor growth and cancers, while reducing signs of aging.

An extremely alkaline food source, raisins contain significant amounts of minerals such as magnesium, iron, potassium and copper. These minerals are considered alkaline, or basic, on the pH scale, and including them in a diet can balance acidity in the stomach.


The potassium in raisins is known to enhance metabolism, muscle strength, electrolytic functions, water balance, and the nervous system. Iron found in raisins assists in metabolizing protein, while helping produce red blood cells and hemoglobin.



History

The process of drying out grape berries creates the delicious, tangy raisins we love to snack on. 

In order for a grape to fully dry, all water contained inside must be removed. Water is redirected from the interior of a grape’s cells, and onto the grape’s surface, where droplets then evaporate. Called diffusion, this process is actually quite challenging, as a strong layer of wax is found in the grape’s skin cuticle, which prevents water from moving through. 

To efficiently and properly dry grapes into raisins, the commercial industry utilizes a 3-step approach in raisin production, including pre-treatment, drying, and post-drying. 


History

The process of drying out grape berries creates the delicious, tangy raisins we love to snack on. 

In order for a grape to fully dry, all water contained inside must be removed. Water is redirected from the interior of a grape’s cells, and onto the grape’s surface, where droplets then evaporate. Called diffusion, this process is actually quite challenging, as a strong layer of wax is found in the grape’s skin cuticle, which prevents water from moving through. 

To efficiently and properly dry grapes into raisins, the commercial industry utilizes a 3-step approach in raisin production, including pre-treatment, drying, and post-drying. 



The earliest-known grape vine, found in Southern France, dates back as far as 35,000,000 BC. 

In 2016, global raisin production weighed in at 1.2 million metric tons, with its top-producing country, the United States, accounting for 24 percent of harvests. 


Our Two Cents 2¢

At Cacao Now, our vision is to create food that is free from refined sugar. Many people hold the general idea that raisins contain excessive amounts of sugar, and wonder how consuming raisins could be any better than eating straight sugar.

While simple and basic to us, we recognize that the answer to this question might be more complex to others.

Nothing compares to whole, intact food. When you eat a whole raisin, it is delivered to your body in conjunction with its natural fibers, which slow the metabolization of sugar — and with its other nutrients, creating a complete, whole food-profile. The body will instantly recognize it as a whole food, rather than as a fragmented piece of something larger.

We encourage everyone to focus on the whole picture, rather than becoming too preoccupied with numbers or math. Food will never be numbers and math.